Things to know before traveling to Tokyo

There is so much to learn about Japanese culture and we just can't know everything. But that doesn't mean you can't prepare in advance. Here are eight of the most important things you should know before traveling to Tokyo.

Tokyo's vibrant Japan has a unique culture of its own and is a landscape developed based on the rules and social conventions. While some traditional customs are gradually being eliminated as the capital is gradually integrating into the world, there are also cultures you should know to behave properly when coming to Tokyo.

 

Greetings

As with most rituals, Tokyo travel is best followed by the guidance of your friend or referral. Just know that people of lower status will bow first and lower to older people. However, today most Japanese people, especially young people, won't expect you to bow and will instead reach out to shake hands. If you meet friends, you can greet your peers in a language like ossu, like saying 'hey' or 'what up'.

 

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Just know that people of lower status will bow first and lower to older people

 

 

Sumimasen and arigatou

It's similar to Westerners, in Japan, when someone does a small favor for you eg opening the door, returning the jacket on the subway seat - is arigatou to say thank you. Or 'sorry for your inconvenience' is sumimasen, which is more commonly used in Japan.

 

Eating out when traveling to Tokyo

Itadakimasu is a polite expression to say to each other before a meal, but this should not be said when eating out, especially at work. But you could say gochisou or gochisousama (which would be 'my compliment to chef') to the chef before you leave, especially in a sit-down restaurant across from where you see the food. are processed directly from the chef.

 

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Itadakimasu is a polite expression to talk to before a meal

 

 

Services when traveling to Tokyo

Westerners are very accustomed to greeting the staff, thanking the store staff, and leaving advice for when eating outdoors. In Japan, especially when you travel to Tokyo, things are a little bit different. No need to respond to irasshaimase (welcome) to warmly welcome shoppers every turn or welcome the first customers of the day. There is also no need to leave any advice as service charges are already integrated into the invoice.

 

How to use chopsticks

Chopsticks are a familiar eating utensil used by most Asians. Many traditional restaurants may not even have alternatives to Chinese-style tablespoons, and eating pasta with a spoon can be a challenge. When visiting a restaurant in Tokyo, be sure to never scrub the chopsticks that you use together (which means 'these are cheap'). And if when traveling to Tokyo or anywhere in Japan, you are given disposable chopsticks, put them back in a paper bag and fold the corner when you're done eating.

 

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When visiting a restaurant in Tokyo, be careful never to scrub the chopsticks that you use together

Slipper

Wear slippers whenever you are provided. It is usually quite obvious when there is a situation where the shoes are not allowed because the other shoes will be lined up with the toes facing the door, and the slippers will be waiting. In Japanese opinion, if wearing shoes on the inner sanctuaries of a temple, the tea ceremony room and onsen are considered impolite and disrespectful to others. In a hotel room, normally there is only one separate pair of slippers for the toilet - be sure not to bring things outside the toilet area. If you are entering someone's home, always make sure to swap your shoes for slippers if your landlord has them available - although some families may choose to wear socks.

 

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If you are entering someone's home, always make sure to swap your shoes for slippers

 

 

Media control

Japan drives on the left side of the road with the driver's side proportionately on the right side of the vehicle. Signage is posted in English or Romaji, and speeds are measured in kilometers. International driving licenses from many countries are accepted and will allow international license holders to drive in Japan for up to one year. The bike lanes are restricted in Tokyo, so be prepared to share the road.

 

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Japan drives on the left side of the road with the driver's side proportionately on the right side of the vehicle

 

 

English and English

When traveling to Tokyo , you should have a dictionary ready, as English signs and notices are not widely available here, except in major tourist areas such as Yoyogi Park and at train stations. implicit. Tokyo metro stations are one of the only places in the city that have all the English signs.

Many Japanese do not or do not want to use English. Also, since the large numbers of foreigners in cities like Tokyo speak Japanese perfectly, locals will often choose to prefer speaking in their native language. However, many university students studying languages ​​and professionals using English for work also often practice the English language with visitors.

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